Thursday, January 2, 2014

Best Reads of 2013 (12th in a Series)

The Art of Racing in the Rain
by Garth Stein

Evaluating his life on the eve of his death, atypical canine Enzo considers the sacrifices his master, Denny Swift, has made in his pursuit of becoming a professional race car driver, and the dog's own efforts to preserve the Swift family.


Dinosaur Kisses
by David Stein

An energetic young dinosaur figures out her own way to give a kiss!

Rose
by Holly Webb

While others at St. Bridget's Home for Abandoned Girls dream of adoption, Rose wants only a job and independence until she is hired as maid to Mr. Fountain, an alchemist, and realizes that she, like his grand residence, is filled with magic.

Christmas from Heaven: the True Story of the Berlin Candy Bomber
by David Warner

“From little things come big things,” Gail Halvorsen remembered his father saying. As a twenty-seven-year-old American pilot, Brother Halvorsen's job was to airdrop much-needed food and supplies to the people of West Berlin in the aftermath of World War II. But it was his simple gift of two sticks of gum that launched an extraordinary humanitarian endeavor and earned him the nickname “The Candy Bomber.” Each day as hundreds of small white parachutes delivered treats to the children of West Germany, the wounds of war began to heal. “Operation Little Vittles” captured the imagination of people everywhere, bringing the spirit of Christmas to a world in need of peace and hope.Famed broadcast journalist and author Tom Brokaw brings this remarkable true story to life in a stunning live performance with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, captured on the accompanying DVD.Also included in the book is a template and directions for creating your own “Candy Bomber” parachutes.


Shakespeare's Pub: A Barstool History of London as Seen Through the Window of its Oldest Pubs-the George Inn
by Pete Brown

"A history of Britain told through the story of one very special pub, from "The Beer Drinker's Bill Bryson" (Times Literary Supplement) Welcome to the George Inn near London Bridge; a cozy, wood-paneled, galleried coaching house a few minutes' walk from the Thames. Grab yourself a pint, listen to the chatter of the locals and lean back, resting your head against the wall. And then consider this: who else has rested their head against that wall, over the last six hundred years."

Teresa Santangelo
Information Specialist


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